Life with Kids at a Waldorf School

Tag Archives: Home School

601430_10152625348510599_1095410600_nEnd of the 3rd quarter today and now it’s spring break, although with still a foot of snow on the ground and the high only in the upper 30’s spring still feels a ways off yet.

Work has gotten very busy lately, so I’m thankful that my mother has been around to lend a helping hand on the days when client meetings keep me busy, and GM has gotten in to a schedule that allows me some flexibility in scheduling. I do still have to remind her on occasion to refer back to her daily plan when she us unsure of what to do next. I’m considering actually creating a daily time chart, however, I’ve struggled in the past with managing that as sometimes an art lesson takes 35 minutes and sometimes it takes an hour and a half. I worry that if I create time limits on things it may create an artificial pressure to complete tasks when it isn’t needed. Continue reading

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It snowed a wee bit last week and then a LOT more on Sunday.  Aside from the terrible roads (due to some extenuating circumstances in Minnesota, which is usually pretty incredible with road clean up) it’s been a lovely reminder that it is almost the middle of December.

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Both my girls love the snow, so we went out on Sunday night to take advantage of the fresh covering. Continue reading


Have you ever thought about starting a Charter School? I’ve been giving it some serious thought.

Yes. some very serious thought.

I do after all live in Minnesota, the birth place of Charter Schools in the country.

I love the online curriculum, but I just keep thinking to myself, I CANNOT be the only mother who is disappointed in the current local schooling options for my child. Yes, Minnesota has many, many private school options, but frankly, with a child in full-time daycare, I’m not able to afford private school tuition as well. Minnesota also has many charter schools in existence, but very few with a focus on gifted children, truly gifted, not just accelerated.  Continue reading


One thing I’ve discovered since beginning the online curriculum is that I’ve been a bit neglectful about planning breaks during the day. We have a few natural breaks, of course over lunch, and Physical Education and snack time, but beyond that, I haven’t been very planful. Now, this hasn’t really become an issue for my daughter until recently.

We cruised through the first quarter of school without too much trouble, partly I think that was because she was just so thrilled to be finally enjoying school and feeling as though she was being successful and challenged.  The other part was, because she was so motivated, she never wanted to take breaks, I practically had to beg her to stop working for a bit so I could catch up. Continue reading



This year has flown by. It is also the first year since my daughter started kindergarten that the upcoming thanksgiving break hasn’t been a stressful, tearful experience. In previous years, this would mark the time of first conferences, historically that hasn’t gone really well for us, then followed by strange short weeks, lots of excitement, and lots of extra sugar, which would only cause my child to bounce off the walls, and then get yelled at. (That’s a whole post in itself.) Continue reading


Hi fellow home school moms (or maybe I should say parents!) I need your help. I’ve got a great curriculum that is working for my 8 year old through K12.com, but I’m looking for something for my 2.5 year old. Any suggestions?


Let me start by saying, I can only answer for my family specifically, but I can give some general information beyond our experience. It is different for many families depending upon the program that works best for your child, and what if any programs are available in your state.

In Minnesota, where we live (home of the first charter school btw) the MNVA (Minnesota Virtual Academy) is considered a public school. That means that all my daughters classes and materials are free to us as long as we live in MN. The K12 curriculum is available nationwide and even internationally, but in some states that do not have this program implemented as a public school option, you must pay for the courses. Continue reading